Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Taos Pueblo


Yesterday Husband and I were up at the crack of dawn, down in hotel lobby getting breakfast shortly after six. Stepson slept. Meanwhile, we were entertained by an extremely perky hotel employee. Husband wondered if they pay her to sit at breakfast tables and be friendly. We have gotten used to surly workers, but everyone here seems to like their work. Perky employee turned to me at one point and asked, in a charming way, "How do you spell the word 'bought'?"

We headed up to Taos as soon as we could all be roused, but stopped in Santa Fe (where we'll be all day today) and almost got stuck! All we wanted was a cup of coffee and good directions, but there is a HEMP STORE there. A college student's dream. We managed to extricate ourselves and continued on our mission.

While driving up Hwy 68, looking at map and road, commenting on the river, it suddenly occurred to me, "That's the Rio Grande." A kind of slap-myself-on-the-side-of-the-head moment. Remember, I'm from the midwest. In my brain, the Rio Grande only exists in westerns.

We stopped shortly before entering Taos to get an incredible vista of the Rio Grande gorge and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. (I hope I can post some pictures later, but need to ask Stepson how.) Then right afterwards were stuck in one of those awful "follow the pilot car" situations. We were actually stopped for about 20 minutes behind a guy holding up a "stop sign" while he was in contact with the highway authorities.

In Taos, besides seeing the plaza, we stopped at a used book store where I saw a way-too-expensive children's religious book, and Husband and step-son had a good chat with the proprietor. It seems one of the "celebrities" who often comes to Taos is Donald Rumsfeld. Most of the people hate him. He just laughs.

By far, the highlight of the day was the Taos Pueblo (pictured above). It was between that and the Kit Carson house, and there was no contest. The man at the bookstore said it was "cosmic." It was. I don't have words to describe it. It's a holy place, but a place of ordinary and simple life.

We took a scenic route back down to Santa Fe, through Kit Carson National Forest. It really is the Land of Enchantment.

And, of course, now even the humble Travelodge has wireless internet. praise be.

13 comments:

Gannet Girl said...

Oh, I haven't been there in SO long! Wonderful trip!

Katherine E. said...

Loved the Donald Rumsfeld line, Diane! (Thanks for taking us along, in a manner of speaking.)

Grandmère Mimi said...

Diane, I wish I could say the same about my visit to the Taos pueblo. It's a marvel to see, but I found it to be one of the most depressing places I've ever been.

The cosmic effect on me was to call to memory the whole cruel history of our violence against Native Americans. It was too much for me. The people there looked so sad. I was glad to get away.

Sorry to rain on your parade. On the other hand, the Sangre De Christo Mountains are gorgeous.

Diane said...

I see your point, Grandmere Mimi. We have a cruel history... the people didn't seem sad to me, though they are poor. It's difficult to know if I'm seeing things through my lens or theirs.

Diane said...

according to their own literature, they don't have plumbing and electricity because it is a "holy place." I need to find out more about their beliefs.

David said...

I need mass quantities of coffee before any encounters with “perky” (no pun intended) people. The perky person in the morning aside, sounds like a great trip so far.

more cows than people said...

wow. you're soaking up so much on vacation. me... just soaking up rest and knitting and family and such. oh and a few films and a certain book. thanks for sharing...

Grandmère Mimi said...

Diane, I could have been reading the people wrong, thinking they were sad, because I was sad.

Pastor Eric said...

Sounds like you are having a great time. I'm looking forward to seeing some pictures. Take care.

Serena said...

Hey, sounds like a great vacation ... thanks for sharing. I'm also vacationing with More Cows ... and she's the one who recommended the movie -:)

Diane said...

oh yeah, now I remember reading More Cows! I thought someone recommended that movie!

Diane said...

grandmere mimi -- there are lots of things about native culture that make me sad, about what we have done...

on the other hand, I like to hear their stories, too.

ann.markle said...

Your trip sounds lovely, as I follow it step-by-step (in reverse -- I'm catching up!). I had the same experience of the holiness of everyday lives long past when I toured Pompeii. I get what you mean.